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Other Radiology articles from the Neuroradiology section Neuroradiology

The Wandering Charm Needle by Vimbai Chekenyere et al.

Published: 2020 Jun
Issue: 14(6) :: Pages: 1-7


Free full text article: The Wandering Charm Needle

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Abstract: Charm needles, otherwise known as susuk, are small pin like objects worn subcutaneously, thought to bring magic powers, bringing health, wealth, beauty, and other benefits to the wearer. These talismans are fairly common in South-East Asia, and are generally thought to be benign entities with few clinical sequela. In fact, no known complications have ever been reported in the literature, as susuk are typically composed of biologically inert precious metals and rarely migrate from their origin. Herein, we detail the first ever reported case of a complication from a charm needle, involving a middle aged Chinese female who had a charm needle subcutaneously inserted into the occipital scalp, which eventually migrated through the skull and into her left cerebellar hemisphere. Our aim is to familiarize readers to this peculiar phenomenon not widely practiced in the western world, and to highlight that charm needles are not as benign as initially conceived. To the best of our knowledge, this case demonstrates the first reported complication of a charm needle in the English medical literature.


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Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Clinical image, Conventional Radiography, Table





Other Radiology articles from the Genitourinary Radiology section Genitourinary Radiology

Urinary bladder lipoma: an illustrative case by Miguel Paniagua et al.

Published: 2020 Jun
Issue: 14(6) :: Pages: 15-21


Free full text article: Urinary bladder lipoma: an illustrative case

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Abstract: Urinary bladder lipomas are rare neoplasms. Therefore, very few of them have been reported in the literature. We present a case that illustrates the typical features that allow radiologists to diagnose this entity: a solid lesion that arises from the urinary bladder wall, showing an endophytic growth and homogeneous hypoattenuation. After its surgical resection, the diagnosis was confirmed by anatomo-pathological analysis. In the discussion we describe other neoplasms that should also be considered when a submucosal bladder neoplasm is detected on computed tomography or other imaging techniques.


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Ultrasound, Computed Tomography, Microscopic pathology, Table





Other Radiology articles from the Gastrointestinal Radiology section Gastrointestinal Radiology

CT diagnosis of appendiceal intussusception in a middle-aged female by Jacob Miller et al.

Published: 2020 Jun
Issue: 14(6) :: Pages: 8-14


Free full text article: CT diagnosis of appendiceal intussusception  in a middle-aged female

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Abstract: Appendiceal intussusception is rare with an estimated incidence of 0.01%. Although it is infrequently encountered, the few documented cases of this entity have shown it may mimic or indicate an underlying neoplasm when evaluated with colonoscopy. With the abundant use of multi-detector CT and increased utility of CT colonography, awareness of the radiologic findings of this condition has become increasingly important. Appendiceal intussusception, while potentially pathologic in its own right, may mimic or even coexist with other pathologies, both malignant and benign. We present a case of adult appendiceal intussusception without a "lead point" that was successfully diagnosed by CT imaging.


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Computed Tomography, Fluoroscopy, Ultrasound, Table





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